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What’s In Store? - Daiki Suzuki

By Andrew Craig
Daiki Suzuki of Engineered Garments

Photo: Rose Callahan

Despite being a native of Japan, Daiki Suzuki is the designer behind some the best Americana-inspired clothes out there today. After some years in America as a buyer, Suzuki founded…

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What’s In Store? - Eunice Lee

By Andrew Craig
Eunice Lee in front of her Nolita shop.

Photo: Rose Callahan

Since its conception in 2000, UNIS has developed into a mainstay of classic and understated design in the menswear scene. The label’s oxfords, chinos, t-shirts, and jackets –…

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What’s In Store? - Todd Snyder

By Andrew Craig
Todd Snyder in his showroom.

Photo: Rose Callahan

After years of designing for American menswear stalwarts Ralph Lauren, Gap, and J.Crew, Todd Snyder’s breakout F/W ’11 collection somehow managed to feel both fresh and satisfyingly classic….

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TOURS : MOVIE

The Tenenbaums

By Siobhan Vivian

Published July 9, 2008

IMAGES  |  MAP

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Sherman Property

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Sherman Property

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The Royal Tenenbaums is Wes Anderson’s visual love letter to New York. Though never explicitly named, the film presents a stunningly constructed pastiche of the quirky, the kitschy and the dreamy details that make this city so magical. Spend a day following the Scout trail and visit five stops that magnify the innocuous beauty of New York through the Anderson lens.

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Eddie the bartender at Gino

Photo: Staff

Eddie the bartender at Gino

Still using the original cash register

Photo: Staff

Still using the original cash register

The famous wallpaper

Photo: Staff

The famous wallpaper

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The man himself, Gino Circiello

Photo: Staff

The man himself, Gino Circiello

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Vahram Mateosian, the new Mr. Ned

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Vahram Mateosian, the new Mr. Ned

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The Tenenbaum Residence

144th St. and Convent Ave.
New York, NY 10031

Even though the pink T pennant no longer flies at the peak of the oxidized copper spire, the Tenenbaum’s urban mansion, nestled on the corner of a tree-lined Harlem street, is unmistakable. And, if you’re feeling sentimental, pour a little out for Buckley when rounding the corner of W 144th. RIP buddy.

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Gino

780 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10021

Gino, an old-school restaurant that first opened in 1945, is where Wes Anderson first spotted the fantastic zebra-print wallpaper, which appears in Margo’s room on the 3rd floor. Keen-eyed visitors will notice that one of Gino’s zebras is missing a stripe. Alas, when the pattern was recently reissued by manufacturer Scalamadre, the imperfection was corrected.

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Mr. Ned*

137 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10010

mrnednyc.com

Wardrobe has always been a meticulous undertaking in all of Wes Anderson’s films, and Anderson himself has blurred the line between costume and fashion. Mr. Ned is where the magic happens. A “speakeasy” tailor inside an unmarked loft in Chelsea, Mr. Ned owner Vahram Mateosian was commissioned to construct all the suits for the Royal Tenenbaums costume department, as well as for Anderson’s own closet.

*By appointment only

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Serendipity 3

225 E 60th St
New York, NY 10022

serendipity3.com

Although Serendipity 3 is not the actual location of the tenuous confrontation between Royal and Margot, we still suggest you visit this old-timey cafe, where you can sit at an old-timey wrought iron table, order a classic butterscotch sundae, and wonder whether or not your father knows your middle name.

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Sherman Property

53 Prospect Park W
Brooklyn, NY 11215

bsec.org

Royal finally concedes to a divorce from Ethel at the front of Henry Sherman’s building in Park Slope. While the distinct plaque reading SHERMAN is no longer there, you will find signage for the Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture.

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COMMENTS

Coleman
said at 11am
September 9, 2009

Visually, the film was a treat; structurally, and story-wise, the film had no plot, except to show the great costume dept. (like all Wes Anderson films)

Brian
said at 3pm
September 17, 2009

I respectfully disagree with the second part of your comment, Coleman. The film is about a man trying to get his family back. The characters and dialogue, like the aesthetics of the film, are incredibly sophisticated while at the same time touching and authentic. Even use of the voice over is executed perfectly - a feat. Anderson will never make a better movie.

amy
said at 1pm
May 20, 2010

this incredible old restaurant is closing it's doors. it was my favorite! the best chopped salad ever.

Sylvia
said at 9am
October 14, 2010

This is one of my favourite films. Every time you see it you notice another detail and all the irony. The more you see it the better it gets.

annkent
said at 9am
November 21, 2010

The Tenenbaums is a classic, something akin to the Preppy Handbook. It will live on forever. I love it.

Seth Hall
said at 12pm
February 3, 2011

My favorite of all Wes Anderson's Films...and in the company of Bottle Rocket & Rushmore, that is saying a lot.

Matthew
said at 9pm
March 19, 2011

I watch Tenenbaums every Christmas morning with my brother while drinking Scotch. The weaving in of A Charlie Brown Christmas is nothing less than brilliant. The characters, the lexicon, the costume it's like a seashell: I put to my ear and it all comes back... that day...you

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